Global Voyage

A Story About Sailing Around the World

Ray & Jenny aboard the ketch Suka

3 years, 35,000 miles, Nov 1982 - Jan 1986

Ray & Jenny Jardine

Chapter 2: Marquesas Magnifique page 36 of 109

Intent on telephoning our respective parents to wish them seasons' greetings, we motored back to Taiohaie on December 24. The bank was closed for the holidays, and because we were nearly out of francs we were unable to buy food for Christmas dinner at Maurice's small store. Not to be daunted, Jenny prepared a dinner from Suka's canned provisions no less fitting for the occasion.

Anxious to explore more, on Christmas Day we weighed anchor. In lieu of a windlass, our usual method in water not so deep was this: One person would stand at the helm and motor slowly toward the anchor, while the other person hauled in chain, hand-over-hand. When over the anchor, the chain was snubbed to the foredeck bitts, letting the ketch's inertia to break the anchor free of the seabed.

photo

Coconut grove

Taipi Bay

This time we traveled east to Taipi (Tie-Pee'), a large bay remarkably shallowed from the sediment effusing from the river of the same name. After passing by a small freighter anchored well out, we cautiously made our way into the bay with one eye on the depth sounder. A quarter-mile from the bight, we anchored in a mere two fathoms.

photo

Anchored in Taipi Bay

Pulling the long distance to shore, we crossed a shallow sand bar and entered the deeper river, to the sounds of large crabs scurrying into their holes along the mud banks. The townspeople were busy unloading supplies lightered to their small quay from the freighter. Landing and securing our "dink" to a tree, we followed a mud road leading through the settlement. The yards of most houses were adorned with pamplemousse trees drooping with the overgrown, succulent grapefruit. Mango trees were abundant, as were the many species of flowers and decorative plants.

The islander's houses were simple: constructed from sheets of tin and plywood, woven mats and palm fronds, they featured at least one large, open window on each wall. These structures were designed to shed the rain yet admit plenty of cross ventilation. Colorful curtains afforded privacy when desired. Outside, immaculate yards comprised, not grass lawns or pruned hedges, but more pragmatically, fruit trees and flourishing vegetable gardens. The gardens were well tended, and the bare grounds surrounding them meticulously raked and kept clear of any debris.

Leaving the village far behind, we climbed into the higher country on a road leading past thousands of coconut trees and many sizable groves of bananas. En route we met two young men headed back toward town carrying a small bundle of spindly, freshly skinned birds, and a 22-caliber rifle exceptionally crude of manufacture.

“We felt rather humiliated trudging past, mud bespattered head to feet and soaked in sweat. It seemed that we were the uncivilized ones.”

Retracing our steps, we eventually reached Taipi village again, just as the Christmas church service was letting out. At least 200 people were congregating in the church yard. Other than being shoeless, for the ground was extremely muddy, they were dressed in their Sunday best. And they looked grand. This surprised us considering their simple lifestyles, and we felt rather humiliated trudging past, mud bespattered head to feet and soaked in sweat. It seemed that we were the uncivilized ones.

The story has 109 pages. This is page 36.
<---- Previous page   Next Page ---->
<< First page   Last page >>
Page Links
GV 001: Title Page
GV 002: TOC
GV 003: Dedication
GV 004: Preface
GV 005: Prologue
GV 006: Beginnings
GV 007: Work Done
GV 008: Making Ready
GV 009: Departure
GV 010: Sailing Credentials
GV 011: First Lesson
GV 012: Sextant Navigation
GV 013: Safety Harness
GV 014: Murphy's law
GV 015: Spirit of Adventure
GV 016: Holding On
GV 017: First Big Storm
GV 018: Storm Intensified
GV 019: Rolling Violently
GV 020: Mizzen Sleeping Bag'sl
GV 021: Freeing the Propeller
GV 022: Visits by Birds
GV 023: Crossing the Doldrums
GV 024: Nearing First Landfall
GV 025: Land Ho
GV 026: Fatu Hiva
GV 027: Trek Inland
GV 028: Anchor Watch
GV 029: Passage
GV 030: Hiva Oa
GV 031: Skin Diving Circus
GV 032: Almost Like a Jungle
GV 033: Polaris Missile
GV 034: Taiohaie Bay
GV 035: Cascade Hakaui
> GV 036: Taipi Bay
GV 037: Cyclone Lisa
GV 038: Cyclone Nano
GV 039: Passage of Patience
GV 040: Tuamotu Archipelago
GV 041: Tahiti
GV 042: Cyclone Reva
GV 043: Secret Sharer
GV 044: Moorea
GV 045: Cyclone Veena
GV 046: Aftermath
GV 047: Good Weather in Papeete
GV 048: Huahine
GV 049: Raiatea
GV 050: BoraBora
GV 051: Rarotonga
GV 052: Tonga
GV 053: Fresh Air
GV 054: Tongan Feast
GV 055: Excursion to Maninita
GV 056: Mariner's Cave
GV 057: Fiji
GV 058: Ndravuni Island
GV 059: Mara Island
GV 060: Aneityum
GV 061: Noumea
GV 062: St Elmo's fire
GV 063: Breakwater Reef
GV 064: Bundaberg
GV 065: Life on the Burnett River
GV 066: Engine Sabotage
GV 067: Flying
GV 068: Aground in Round Hill Creek
GV 069: Gladstone Confinement
GV 070: Tropical Queensland
GV 071: Trip into Townsville
GV 072: Cairns Sojourn
GV 073: Cramped Cooktown
GV 074: Lizard Island
GV 075: The San Michelle
GV 076: Lost Mummy Cave
GV 077: Land's End
GV 078: Darwin
GV 079: Christmas Is
GV 080: Passage
GV 081: Cocos Keeling
GV 082: Crossing the Indian Ocean
GV 083: Rodriguez
GV 084: Mauritius
GV 085: Reunion Cirque de Mafate
GV 086: Reunion Cirque de Salazie
GV 087: Passage to Africa
GV 088: Kruger National Park
GV 089: Richards Bay
GV 090: Durban
GV 091: Port Elizabeth
GV 092: Cape Town
GV 093: Storm Passage
GV 094: St Helena
GV 095: Passage to Brazil
GV 096: Fortaleza
GV 097: Passage to Caribbean
GV 098: Bonaire
GV 099: Passage to Panama
GV 100: Panama
GV 101: Panama Canal
GV 102: Medidor
GV 103: Costa Rica
GV 104: Passage to Acapulco
GV 105: Acapulco to Cabo
GV 106: Baja
GV 107: Home Port
GV 108: In Retrospect
GV 109: Next Time
Previous Article
 1981 Baja8 Ed 
 Home   RayJardine.com 
Copyright © 2017
26,981,808 visitors
 
PLEASE DO NOT COPY these photos and pages to other websites. Thank you!
Next Article
 1987 PCT 1