Aerospace Kayak Construction

How we Build our Kayaks

1995 - 1997

Ray Jardine

Nunaluk

The construction of Nunaluk

Returning to the computer in the fall of 1996, I spent 2 weeks redesigning the kayak and engineering a more efficient layup. The next logical step in our construction methods was to vacuum bag the assemblies, and this we determined to do.

Copyright © Ray Jardine

For this next mold we again used particleboard and stringers. The photo shows the mold partially covered in foam. We used the foam only on the mold - it did not become core for the boat.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

Spray painting the finished mold.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

After laminating the mold, we vacuum bag it.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

The epoxy has cured and we have removed the vacuum bag and are peeling back the breather/bleeder ply and the release film - exposing the new hull.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

We unfasten the mold from the strongback, roll it over and place the assembly in its cradles. We then trim the excess lamina beyond the sheer.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

Lath resting on the new hull, indicating the position of the bulkheads.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

For hull stiffeners we used strips of 1/2" small-cell styrofoam.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

After covering some of the strips with carbon and some with s-glass, we vacuum bag them to the hull.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

Bulkheads standing in position.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

Bulkhead kevlar-tape being vacuumed into place.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

We have returned the mold to the cradles atop the strongback, and covered the open deck with foam. Here we are fairing and longboarding the deck mold with polyester putty.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

After vacuum bagging the deck, we remove the assembly from the strongback and make a set of deck cradles. Then we place the new deck in its cradles, and envelope-bag various under-deck stiffeners to it.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

The underside of the deck, showing the stiffeners. The cockpit openings are intentionally undersized for extra strength prior to assembly.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

The hull and deck prior to assembly.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

The hull and deck have been seam-taped together, internally.


Post curing
Copyright © Ray Jardine

Post curing the kayak in an autoclave made of expanded polystyrene.


Copyright © Ray Jardine

Envelope bagging a hatch cover.


The new kayak on the water.
Copyright © Ray Jardine

The completed kayak, Nunaluk ready for its summer of Arctic adventure.

Please note: These photos and descriptions are for general interest only. With apologies I do not have time to answer questions about them.

Nunaluk

Nunaluk and Siku

The story has 4 pages. This is page 3.
<---- Previous page   Next Page ---->
<< First page   Last page >>
Siku Kayak built by Ray & Jenny Jardine

Previous Article
 Jennys Artwork 
 Home   RayJardine.com 
Copyright © 2017
27,077,157 visitors
 
PLEASE DO NOT COPY these photos and pages to other websites. Thank you!
Next Article
 Knife Making